Sunday, 16 September 2012

A Slippery Shot, A Classic Design & A Door

"Alien Landscape" is my first image for today. This was shot out on the slippery rocks at Cuckmere Haven in Sussex on the South Coast of England. As you follow the cliff face into the distance you can see it dip revealing the grass as it starts to rise up again towards Beachy Head at Eastbourne. That dip is Birling Gap, another beauty spot and highly scenic area. If you get your timing right you can walk along the beach from Cuckmere to Birling Gap when the tide is out. It's not something that i'd like to try, if timing is wrong it's then a race against time to get there before the sea rises and starts to hammer away at the chalk wall of the cliffs. The slip slide back to the pebble beach was equally as treacherous after I'd grabbed this shot!



"St John the Baptist" is image number two.This Roman Catholic Church stands proud in a very nondescript road in Kemptown in Brighton (England). It was the first Roman Catholic church built in Brighton after restrictions on Catholic worship were removed by the process of Catholic Emancipation in the early 19th century. It was consecrated on 7 July 1835 and opened on 9 July 1835. Maria Fitzherbert (a twice-widowed Catholic who began a relationship with the Prince Regent and secretly married him in 1785) died in 1837 and was buried at the church. A memorial stone and sculpture were placed in the nave.



Last image for today is called "Porte". An unusual looking door with a rather nautical feel to it. Hardly surprising really as this is the door to Shoreham Lifeboat station on the south coast of England. I like this image as it's full of shapes, curves and lines and divides itself up neatly so it's pleasing to the eye. The rule of thirds is a rule that I try to break but often and unwittingly seem to adhere too. At the time of capturing the shot I simply made sure the door was as central as possible and grabbed the image. It was only once I got back and started the processing procedure that I noticed just how balanced everything was.



All Photography © Justin Hill