Tuesday, 11 December 2012

Medieval Tree, Big Boat & Captured Calm

"Shade of the Yew " :- For some reason Yew trees are often found growing in graveyards. I think it dates from Medieval times and there are many theories to account for the ancient practice of planting churchyards and cemeteries with yew trees but they are only theories...nobody is certain or knows for sure. This fine and ancient Yew can be found in the churchyard of Stanmer Church in Stanmer Village within Stanmer Park, Brighton (England). The church itself was declared redundant in 2008 and is no longer in use but has been listed as a Grade II building. Stanmer's recorded history goes back to 765 A.D. but the church was was built in the Middle Ages and records of it can be found going back to 1232. Amazingly remnants from that era can still be seen and you are looking at one of them right now as this Yew tree is from that time!



"Floating Luxury" :- A crisp sharp chilly afternoon provided me with the opportunity to capture this crisp sharp and calm image. I'm always amazed by the size of some of the boats and yachts moored at Brighton marina (South coast of England). It seems to me that people are showing off when buy a ridiculously expensive boat, can then afford to pay for it to be kept within a marina and then don't use it so much. Waterborne decadence.It is, however, very calming to wander about the marina. The clanking of cables on masts, gulls calling as they swoop about etc.



"Wish You Were Here" :- Captured on Brighton beach (England) near the West Pier. I'd been photographing the sunset going down behind the pier's famous iron framework when I decided to turn and have a look around in other directions. This view hit me with an overwhelming feeling of sereneness and calm. I climbed up onto the groyne / breakwater to gain some height for a better viewpoint and then had the notion of shooting straight down it and making it a major part of the shot. From this angle you can clearly see the way the groyne does its job with the seawater and pebbles on either side at different heights.



All Photography by Justin Hill ©