Monday, 16 September 2013

Umber and Ochre, Sea Wall Shade and Danger Door

"Umber and Ochre" :- I have always been fascinated and amazed with the rich colours that rust and corrosion create with various metals. With the old Victorian iron supports that once held up the West Pier on Brighton seafront (UK) natural pigmentation has slowly evolved and developed over the years as the salt water and other elements have attacked the metal. Luckily enough for me the sun was beating down on the beach the day that I wandered down there so the sea was also rich in colour.



"Sea Wall Shade" :- This is one of the routes that I can take when walking into Brighton from the village of Ovingdean on the south coast of England. It's a 4.3 mile (6.9 km) walk but when the weather is mild it's a very pleasant journey and amble. The undercliff walk was constructed and built in the 1930's and it stretches from Brighton all the way along to Saltdean and it offers wonderful views of the English Channel and Brighton Marina. You do have to have your wits about you though as chalk does often crumble and fall from the face of the cliff and you do not want want a large lump of that in the back of the head!



"Danger Door" :- A few of the signs and stickers of this bright red door tell you that it would be wise to keep your distance and definitely not to try and enter. One says "Hazard" and the larger yellow one with the black outlined triangle on it clearly states "Danger of Death". I am assuming that there's some huge electrical supply on the other side which has something to do with Brighton's famous pier as this door is directly below it and tucked away in a corner down on the beach. It's part of the seafront that's best to be avoided, due to the shelter it provides you often find drunks and transients lurking about down there. Empty beer cans are often scattered about the place and your olfactory receptors are constantly under attack by some of the odorous and more unpleasant smells that frequent the place.



All Photography Copyright © Justin Hill